PER Volume 2 (2009)

Editors’ Note

As we publish the second annual volume of Preservation Education and Research, we are pleased to announce the addition of a third editor, Dr. Kevin Glowacki. Kevin, an assistant professor teaching art and architectural history and a fellow of the Center for Heritage Conservation at Texas A&M University, specializes in Classical and Near Eastern art and archaeology. Kevin’s active participation in the journal will broaden the editorship to represent another important facet of historic preservation.

We received an ISSN (International Standard Serial) number, which will allow PER to be more easily referenced for interlibrary requests and make library and sale distribution straightforward.

The articles in this volume once again span a range of subject areas and have been selected via a rigorous blind peer review process. The first two papers deal with preservation education issues. Choi’s Meiji Restorations: Defining Preservation, Education, and Architecture for Modern Japan examines how the Japanese, in the early twentieth century, developed their own approach to the identification of culturally and historically important sites in teaching architectural history and in preservation law. In “So, Can You Revit?” Historic Preservation Design Education and Digital Media, Kapp investigates the relevance of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for historic preservation design studio. The third paper, Tectonics, Tolerances, and Time: Examining Eero Saarinen’s and Mies van der Rohe’s Buildings at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, by Whitehead, assesses the challenges in conserving Modernism. The next three papers address landscape preservation at a variety of scales. The Challenge of Nominating the Underground Railroad in Delaware as a Historic Byway by Ames et al. discusses issues associated with historic sites having intrinsic but intangible qualities. The article Expanding Histories/Expanding Preservation: The Wild Garden as Designed Landscape, by Way and Callcott, examines preservation issues related to designed woodlands. In A Critical View of Landscape Preservation and the Role of Landscape Architects, Ruggles discusses the increasing international role of landscape architects in preservation. This volume ends with a special report by Thomas Visser on The Status of Professional Career Openings in Historic Preservation in the United States (2008).

The Book Review editor, Catherine Zipf, solicited four reviews of books that focus on education and often are used as texts. The first two are newly published. Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation by John H. Stubbs and Building: 3000 Years of Design, Engineering, and Construction by Bill Addis are encyclopedic reviews of international developments in the field. Well known to our readers, both Historic Preservation: An Introduction to Its History, Principles, and Practice (2nd edition) by Norman Tyler, Ted J. Ligibel and Ilene R. Tyler, and Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America (3rd edition) by William J. Murtagh have recently been re- published. It is gratifying to see such books continue to be popular.

We thank NCPE for the continuing opportunity to edit PER and for their support. We would also like to thank the Clarence S. Stein Institute for Urban Landscape Studies at Cornell University; Historic Urban Plans; the College of Architecture at Texas A&M University; the Department of Architecture; and the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at Texas A&M University for sponsoring the journal.

Finally, we continue to urge members of NCPE to submit scholarly papers to the journal. The next deadline is February 1, 2010.

ANAT GEVA, NANCY VOLKMAN, and KEVIN GLOWACKI
Editors, Preservation Education & Research

 Contents

Articles

Meiji Restorations: Defining Preservation, Education, and Architecture for Modern Japan
Don Choi

“So, Can You Revit?” Historic Preservation Design Education and Digital Media
Paul Hardin Kapp

Tectonics, Tolerances, and Time: Examining Eero Saarinen’s and Mies van der Rohe’s Buildings at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa
Robert Whitehead

The Challenge of Nominating the Underground Railroad in Delaware as a Historic Byway
David l. Ames, Sarah Beetham, Lael Ensor, Ann Fangmann, Eerin Ferriter, Robin Krawitz, and Debra Martin

Expanding Histories/ Expanding Preservation: The Wild Garden as Designed Landscape
Thaisa Way, and Steve Callcott

A Critical View of Landscape Preservation and the Role of Landscape Architects
D. Fairchild Ruggles

Special Report

The Status of Professional Career Openings in Historic Preservation in the United States
Thomas D. Visser

Book Reviews

John H. Stubbs, Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation: Parameters, Theory, & Evolution
Duncan Campbell

Bill Addis, Building: 3,000 Years of Design Engineering and Construction
Gregor Kalas

Norman Tyler, Ted J. Ligibel, and Ilene R. Tyler, Historic Preservation: An Introduction to Its History, Principles, and Practice (2nd edition)
Karen l. Jessup

William J. Murtagh, Keeping Time: The History and Theory of Preservation in America (3rd edition)
Paul C. Diebold

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About PER

PER disseminates international peer-reviewed scholarship relevant to historic environment education from fields such as historic preservation, heritage conservation, heritage studies, building and landscape conservation, urban conservation, and cultural patrimony.

ISSN 1946-5904

Call for Papers, Short Essays, and Book Reviews

PER welcomes article manuscripts, short responses to previously published articles (Forum essays), and book reviews on topics relevant to historic environment education from fields such as historic preservation, heritage conservation, heritage studies, building and landscape conservation, urban conservation, and cultural patrimony. International submissions (in English) are encouraged.

Only original work that has not been published previously and is not under review elsewhere will be considered.

Refer to the guidelines for authors for more information.